Na Upena Lawai'a O Ka Wa Kahiko Ame Ka Lakou Hana / The Fishing Nets of Old And Their Uses

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Na Upena Lawai'a O Ka Wa Kahiko Ame Ka Lakou Hana / The Fishing Nets of Old And Their Uses

(Written by Z. P. K. Kawaikaumaiikamakaoka‘ōpua.)

(Continued.)

The pā‘ou‘ou net. This is the best net to catch all sorts of fish in shallow waters. This type of net is a round net.  There are four sticks made of ‘ūlei; this first ‘ūlei is laid out until it reaches a loop, then another ‘ūlei is attached; that is continued on until all of the ‘ūlei sticks have been inserted and then the net will be rounded.

There are many cords, or hānai, for this kind of net; there are four, just like the ‘a‘ei net used for ‘ōpelu.  On top of each of these hānai, the ropes used to pull the base of the net, there is a small, nicely shaped basalt stone of just the right size that already has a hole, and it is there that the rope is tied below the base of the net, which is then the place where you would fasten the decoy fish.  On the sides of this pā‘ou‘ou net, there are some small bags.  These small pockets were made to make the net puff out, so that it does not twist and stretch.  If the person doing this wants ‘ōpule, then he has to find ‘ōpule [as a decoy] so they can be caught in his gill net.

A basket to transport the decoy fish must first be prepared, and in the morning, the fisherman must be alert when going to where this net will be set, because if he is very lucky, this type of fish will be caught in his net.  And if you do not get this kind of fish, then you have to go early in the morning and dive for wana, or sea urchin.

This is a type of net that must be set in the very early morning.  And when the wana is caught, you must pound it to a pulp, then it is put into the net, and the net is released into the fishing spot, or au.  That is the way it is said by the elders: the place where you set the net is an au.

 

(To Be Continued.)

 

 

(click image for original Hawaiian text)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, March 29, 1923
, Book: 62, Number: 13, Page: 4