** Ka Anesona Moolelo No Hawaii Nei - Helu 8 / Andersons Account Concerning Hawaii - Number 8

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** Ka Anesona Moolelo No Hawaii Nei - Helu 8 / Andersons Account Concerning Hawaii - Number 8

HEAT FROM THE EARTH

The road lies from the mountain to Waimea, amid the woods, but most of the road is a horse path. It is twelve miles from the sea to the grounds of the missionaries, directly atop the heights, seemingly a flat plain when observed from the mountain, but the actual truth is that it is broken up by valleys and hills, continuing on a slope all the way to Kawaihae. In the last hours of our ride on that road, we saw the heat being cast up above the clouds. There is a procession of mountains to the side of us running from west to east and then continues on; the clouds were black, rising up from the line of mountains, as though sudden rainstorms would pour down upon us. Their fall upon us, however, was shielded by the heat rising from the earth.

[...]

Here Maunaloa is clearly seen to the south, as is the lava flow (almost the entire flow can be seen) which turned in A.D. 1859 to a place quite near the summit of the mountain, then flowed seaward for thirty miles. Laiana told us about the long firy stream, terrifying to look upon when he saw it from his house.

A PRAYER SERVICE WAS GREATLY DESIRED

A call was made for all true Christians of South Kohala and Hamakua to assemble on Monday. That call set up many people, and if they had all come, then not half of that assembly would have been seated in the meeting house, even if the seating had been improved.  The house was filled and the pastor and the assembly thought deeply about ways to make that meeting pleasant. Two songs were composed by Liana and Samuela, they being two members, and these were sung with great joy by the choir; a speech was given to Timoteo and actually done by him, he being the old Deacon in the church. The prayer service containing those two actions was almost like everything that prayer services of the finest missionary areas of our own land here would ever want.

[...]

 

(click image for original Hawaiian text)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, March 16, 1865
, Book: 4, Number: 11, Page: 1