** I Na Keiki Hanohano I Ko Lakou Oihana Mikioi; Pumehana / To The Honorable Youths of Their Skilled Profession; Warm Regards

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** I Na Keiki Hanohano I Ko Lakou Oihana Mikioi; Pumehana / To The Honorable Youths of Their Skilled Profession; Warm Regards

On the 23rd of February, 1877, the lava was seen in South Kona, and early morning on the 24th, some of the wrath the Queen of the Crater had established was clearly seen outside of Keʻei.

On this very day is when the Kīlauea had returned from her journey far below Kapalilua and surrounding districts, and had already seen this new thing. So it let down it's anchor at Kealakekua, and all of the dignitaries sailed off to witness the actions of the fires of the uplands, yet of the sea as well. Those who saw clearly were the ones who sailed to where the lava was in action; and when it would explode, they grabbed for it, and caught some stones still hot, but in no time, completely cooled.

H.M. Whitney was there, as was the main engineer of the Kīlauea, Mr. Campbell, Judge J.G. Hoapili, J.O. Moot, the Purser of the Kīlauea, W.W. Hall, W. Wilder, the Honorable S.K. Kaai and D. Kamaiopili.

That last named person was the one who was most fearful, calling out to neighboring canoes to come and take him ashore. According to him, "I traveled by see and saw firsthand". Brave and fearless were the main engineer of the Kīlauea and Mr. Wilder, and they were steared properly to above where the lava was launching its attack. There were rumbles, shudders, and things never before seen were witnessed at that hour.

Following the return of these people listed above, the Noble Hon. A.S. Cleghorn sailed out.

On the return of the Kīlauea, Princess Likelike accompanied her chief headed to Kawaihae and onto the Mountain Lands and the home at Mānā.

There are many things about the news but all is not possible. With appreciation,

D. Kamaiopili

 

(click image for original Hawaiian text)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, March 3, 1877
, Book: 16, Number: 9, Page: 2